Can you get COVID 19 if you are diabetic?

Can COVID-19 increase blood sugar in diabetics?

Patients may experience higher blood sugars with infections in general, and this certainly applies to COVID-19 as well, so close contact with your health care team is needed to make sure you receive the appropriate treatments or insulin doses.

Do different types of diabetes respond differently to COVID-19?

While diabetes type does not affect a person’s response to the coronavirus, how well-managed their diabetes is, or whether or not they have co-morbidities such as obesity or hypertension, has an impact.

What are some symptoms of COVID-19?

People with COVID-19 have reported a wide range of symptoms, ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2 to 14 days after exposure to the virus. Symptoms may include: fever or chills; cough; shortness of breath; fatigue; muscle or body aches; headache; new loss of taste or smell; sore throat; congestion or runny nose; nausea or vomiting; diarrhea.

What are some of the lingering side effects of COVID-19?

A full year has passed since the COVID-19 pandemic began, and the mind-boggling aftermath of the virus continues to confuse doctors and scientists. Particularly concerning for doctors and patients alike are lingering side effects, such as memory loss, reduced attention and an inability to think straight.

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How does COVID-19 affect the blood?

Some people with COVID-19 develop abnormal blood clots, including in the smallest blood vessels. The clots may also form in multiple places in the body, including in the lungs. This unusual clotting may cause different complications, including organ damage, heart attack and stroke.

Does blood type affect the risk of severe illness from COVID-19?

In fact, the findings suggest that people with blood type A face a 50 percent greater risk of needing oxygen support or a ventilator should they become infected with the novel coronavirus. In contrast, people with blood type O appear to have about a 50 percent reduced risk of severe COVID-19.

What are COVID-19 toes?

Erythema pernio, known as chilblains, have been frequently reported in younger individuals with mild COVID-19 to the extent that they have earned the moniker “COVID toes.” However, the reason behind their development is not yet apparent.

Who is at higher risk for severe COVID-19 illness?

Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions, including people with liver disease, might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19. People with chronic liver disease, including hepatitis B and hepatitis C, may have concerns and questions related to their risk.

Does research show that the COVID-19 vaccine will work for people with diabetes or hyperglycemia?

Neither diabetes per se nor hyperglycemia appear to impair the antibody response to SARS-CoV-2, suggesting that a COVID-19 vaccine would be just as effective in people with diabetes as in those without, new research finds.

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Who should not get the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine?

If you have had a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) or an immediate allergic reaction, even if it was not severe, to any ingredient in an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (such as polyethylene glycol), you should not get an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.

What are the side effects of the second COVID-19 vaccine?

The most common side effects after the second dose were injection site pain (92.1% reported that it lasted more than 2 hours); fatigue (66.4%); body or muscle aches (64.6%); headache (60.8%); chills (58.5%); joint or bone pain (35.9%); and a temperature of 100° F or higher (29.9%).